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Portraits of Creatvitiy

Sequel Staff

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I am kind of a huge history buff, I am not buff at all, I wish I was. I am just fascinated by all eras in history. My favorite time periods are the Renaissance, 1960s in the US, and the American Revolution. The power of the past is truly magical. But I won’t bore you with the dastardly details of American Revolution battle. Join me as I ramble about various artists, writers, and their magical lives.

jori-bolton

Art by Jori Bolton

So, you have drama queens. You have Regina George from Mean Girls, etcetera you know what I mean. But then you have Julie D’Aubigny the coolest sword fighting opera singer to walk this world. She known as La Maupinis, a bisexual, cross-dressing, swordswoman, opera singer who wouldn’t let anyone stand in her path. Absolutely no one.

D’Aubigny’s artistic history began in Marseille where she and her assistant fencing master, Sérannes made a living by giving fencing demonstrations. Once a man refused to believe that D’Aubigny was a woman due to her over the top talent. Guess what d’Aubigny did in response?

No, not nothing. You’re talking to the most overdramatic women of the 17the century. You know what she did? She opened up her blouse and flashed him like every normal person. She also dressed in male clothing and sang in an opera company.

Soon, she ditched her boyfriend and sang in the Marseille Opéra. She got the job thanks to her fencing! While she would duel, she sang to taunt her enemy, and the audience fell in love with her captivating voice.

At the Marseille Opéra, she was known as the La Maupin. She was exceptionally talented even though she had absolutely no training. She was a contralto (which fits her) and found memorization to be easy thanks to her photographic memory.

There she became involved with one of her fans, a merchant’s daughter. Of course, the girl’s parents weren’t too delighted about this so she was sent to a nunnery. Queue D’Aubigny swooping in to save the day. In order to be with her love, she stole the body of a dead nun, placed it in the bedroom of her love, and set the whole nunnery on fire. Get. Rekt.

There was one day when she attended the ball dresses up as a man and charmed a young lady who apparently had 3 other suitors. They weren’t happy when they found that D’Aubigny had kissed their lady. So D’Abuigny solved the problem by rolling up her sleeves and raising her fists, in this case it was her sword. She dueled the 3 men at once and defeated them all but was forced to exile since the king had banned dueling.

As time went on she sang in various operas by Pascal Collasse, André Cardinal Destouches, and André Campra. Andre Campra even wrote a special song to fit her range.

However, our favorite swash-buckling heroine’s misadventures would soon come to an end in 1707 when she died at the ripe age of 33. Thus ends the tumultuous, scandalous, and wild life of Julie D’Aubigny. I hope one day I can exude as much confidence as her. Who knows maybe I will take my hand at fencing even.

Randhika Aturaliya 17′ || Online Content Manager

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Portraits of Creatvitiy